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WEATHER UPDATE

New York, US
1:43 pm, Sep 20
75°F
L: 71° H: 78°
Feels like 74.95 °F overcast clouds
Wind gusts: 3 m/s
UV Index: 0
Precipitation: 0 inch
Visibility: 10 km
Sunrise: 6:41 am
Sunset: 6:57 pm
Humidity 61 %
Pressure1027 mb
Wind 3 m/s

Sanitation

Refuse removal is contracted out by the village. The current company is Meadow Carting (338-0121).

Pick up is Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday between 7:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Collections are not made on legal holidays. Recyclables are picked up on Thursday (Glass is no longer considered a recyclable). Big bulk items are picked up on Saturdays. Only one (1) big item will be picked up at a time.

Household waste will be collected from no more than four containers left at the rear or side of the house. Rubbish, including grass clippings, cardboard boxes and similar debris should be left at the front of the property immediately behind the hedge line ( about five feet in from the sidewalk ). Newspapers are picked up every Thursday. Leave them at the hedge line. Recyclables are picked up on Thursdays as well.

The following items will be EXCLUDED FROM ALL PICK UPS:
Scrap Lumber and other debris resulting from the construction or renovation of premises by Contractors. Hazardous waste, volatile materials, propane tanks, gas tanks, brick asphalt, concrete, granite, marble and all other stone and stoneware, lime asbestos, automobile parts (engines, transmissions, rear ends, auto body parts, etc.) Pipes, Infectious and biological waste, logs larger than 4” in diameter or longer than 4’, chain link fencing, and cables.

Meadow Carting: (516) 338-0121

  • RESIDENT DROP OFF – Open: Sundays 7:30am – 3:30pm
  • 999 West Shore Road, Roslyn, NY
  • www.northhempstead.com
  • 516-869-6311

North Hempstead residents have an additional means to dispose of non-hazardous waste such as general refuse, furniture, residentially generated construction and demolition debris, and yard waste. There is a minimum vehicle charge of $5.00 (includes 100 lb. Disposal, $1 per each additional 20lbs.) and no charge for recyclables and E-waste (computers, electronics, TV’s, batteries).Proof of residency is required. Commercial vehicles are not allowed.

Public comments on the 2020 Draft Stormwater Management program Annual Report are invited and can be made at Village Hall, by calling (516) 482-4409.

Pursuant to a permit obtained from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, the Village is implementing a five (5) year program to reduce the impact on our tidal and freshwater wetlands from storm water runoff. A major component of this program is the reduction of pollutants, such as pathogen containing pet wastes, trash, petroleum products, and nutrients and toxics found in lawn care and gardening products from being discarded into or from leaching into the Village’s drainage systems. Also, feeding pigeons geese and encouraging them to become “year-around residents” creates a mess on our buildings and sidewalks or lawns, athletic fields and golf courses and contributes pollution to our ponds and bays.

To meet the program goals, the Village is asking residents to get involved and help. By being careful with waste disposal, chemical use, cleaning up after our pets and not feeding waterfowl, and pigeons we can reduce the impairments of the receiving waters and improve the aesthetics of the community.

What you can do to prevent Non Point Source Pollution.

You can help keep our environment clean by:

  • 1. REPORTING ILLEGAL PUMPING, DUMPING or direct connection to a drain or waterway to the Nassau County Illicit Discharge Hotline (516) 571-6863
  • 2. CLEANING UP AFTER YOUR PET
    Pet waste contains harmful bacteria and organisms that can spread disease. Pick up pet waste; seal it in a plastic bag, and dispose of it in trashcans. Don’t hose waste into storm drains. Drains are a direct conduit to our waterways and beaches. Help keep our neighborhood, beaches, and waterways healthy and clean.
  • 3. NOT FEEDING GEESE, DUCKS
    While we all love our “feathered friends”, feeding them interrupts the natural migratory cycle. Birds that would normally migrate south in the winter to find food, take up residence if food is “artificially” provided. Further, these resident birds attract migrating birds that in turn will stay if food is present. The result of artificial waterfowl feeding can be large flocks of resident birds that create a nuisance in our parks, athletic fields, golf courses and lawns, and place an extra pollution load on our waterways. Once feeding is discontinued, geese will disperse and revert to higher quality natural foods. Geese that depend on human handouts are also less likely to migrate when severe winter weather arrives, and are more vulnerable to disease.
  • 4. NOT FEEDING PIGEONS:
    While cute, flocks of pigeons roosting on public buildings and bridges can cause disease and pollute our waterways. Please don’t encourage pigeons to nest in our village by feeding them.
  • 5. PROPERLY USING FERTILIZERS and PESTICIDES ON YOUR LAWN AND GARDEN
    If you think you must use heavy amounts of pesticides to grow a beautiful lawn, think again. A bright green, weed-free lawn can be yours by following these simple steps:

    • Mow your lawn only as needed. If the grass has gotten too tall, don’t mow it down all at one time. Mow gradually, cutting no more than an inch off with the first mowing. Allow the lawn to recover for a day or two, and then trim another inch. Continue cutting an inch at a time until you reach the desired height.
    • Water wisely.Don’t water on a timer. Some grasses need more water than others, so figure out what kind of grass you have before you decide to water it frequently. When you do water, soak the grass through to the roots, not just the top of the blades.
    • Use slow-release, organic fertilizers. Most lawn and garden centers now offer several organic fertilizers along with the more standard varieties.
    • Keep all toxic materials in a locked cabinet or garden shed. If you must continue to use pesticides on a limited basis, be sure to remove children and their toys as well as pets from any area where the chemicals are being stored or used.
  • 6. DISPOSING OF YOUR GARBAGE PROPERLY
    Garbage should be kept in containers with lids that are animal proof. Open containers or plastic garbage bags provide an inviting target for raccoons and other wildlife. We can keep our garbage from being strewn about the neighborhood and ending up in our waterways by using the right containers.
  • 7. SEPARATING YOUR RECYCLEABLES AND PUTTING THEM OUT ON THE DESIGNATED DAY
    It is important to recycle paper, plastics, glass, and metals. Reusing these materials and keeping them out of our environment is one way to keep our waters clean. Please help by separating paper, glass, plastics and metals and putting them out on the designated day or the night before.
  • 8. DISPOSING OF YOUR HOUSEHOLD HAZARDOUS WASTES AND RECYCLEABLE USED AUTOMAOTIVE PRODUCTS AT A TOWN SITE
    The S.T.O.P. (Stop Throwing Out Pollutants) program offers residents of North Hempstead the opportunity to dispose of their household hazardous waste in an environmentally friendly manner. Many people do not realize that ordinary household products, such as aerosols and cleaners, can be corrosive, explosive, or toxic if mixed indiscriminately with regular household garbage.The Town of North Hempstead’s S.T.O.P. collection and motor oil recycling programs are available to all Village residents. I urge all residents to take advantage of both programs.

    Under the S.T.O.P. program, the Town will accept for disposal chemicals such as pesticides, aerosol cans, household cleaners and used motor oil. For more information call the Town recycling Hotline: (516) 767- 4600

  • SO PITCH IN
    We can all work together to keep our Village beautiful and our waterways clean.
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